Originally published Sunday, October 20, 2019 at 06:32p.m.

KINGMAN – Mohave County’s special use permits for special events and the future of the Moss Mine expansion are two among many salient issues to be discussed by the Mohave County Board of Supervisors.

The meeting is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 21, 2360 McCulloch Blvd. in Lake Havasu City.

“According to the Mohave County Zoning Ordinance, special use permits are required for establishments of temporary or permanent enterprises involving large assemblages of people,” wrote Supervisor Buster Johnson of District 3 in a memo to the board. “It has come to attention that Development Services may be waiving these requirements for certain events. It is my belief that if we have these requirements, we should be enforcing the same rules for everyone.”

Johnson would like the county staff to review the process for special use permits and come back to the board with a recommendation on keeping them in place or revamping the county’s policy to ensure everyone is treated fairly.

Presently, special use permits are required for establishments of temporary or permanent enterprises involving large assemblages of people or automobiles, including amusement parks, circuses, fairgrounds, open-air theaters, race tracks and recreational centers.

The county received an invitation from the local Bureau of Land Management to “cooperate” in the project of possible expansion of the Moss Mine located about 5 miles east of Bullhead City and privately held by Golden Vortex Corporation. On Monday, the supervisors will be reviewing a memorandum of understanding establishing the nature and rules of cooperation between the agencies.

“The off-road folks expressed concern that recreational trail access would be lost or negatively affected by the Moss Mine expansion,” wrote Mohave County Planning and Zoning Director Christine Ballard in an Oct. 7 email to BLM. “The Board agreed that the matter could be covered under the MOU [memorandum of understanding] for the Mine Operations Plan's environmental assessment. To address the off-road communities concerns as well as the Boards, we added ‘trails’ to those paragraphs that described the County's responsibilities.”

“The mine has already agreed to construct an alternate route as a part of their mine plan to address this concern and it's getting carried forward into the NEPA [The National Environmental Policy Act] analysis,” responded Amanda Dodson from BLM Kingman Field Office.