Originally published Friday, March 3, 2017 at 06:00a.m.

More than 200 Mohave County women have been honored in the 33 years Women Making History has taken place in Kingman. This is a testament to how many substantial women have lived in the county. Nationally, March is Women Making History Month and every year the Women Making History Committee honors women who have made a sustaining contribution to their community. Women have been nominated each year since 1984.

Winners are decided by committee in a variety of categories and receive recognition at a ceremony at the Mohave Museum of History and Arts. This year’s ceremony will be held Sunday, March 5th, at 2 p.m. The public is invited to attend.

This year’s winners are in Education: Susan Burdsal, Volunteerism: Kari Jo Hill, Professions: Dr. Kelly Shuffler Moore, Pioneering: Sue Baughman, Public Service: Sharon Henry, Health/Medical Professional: Morgan Carroll, Arts: Trish Cobb, Business: Christie Freiday and Lifetime Achievement: Dr. Attiya Salim.

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Sue Baughman

Sue Baughman

Pioneering

Nominated by Celeste Irons

According to nominator Celeste Irons, Sue “Itchy Foot” Baughman was “born to hike” and this passion and drive has resulted in a nearly eight-mile trail system built around Dolan Springs, north of Kingman. After twenty-two years in the Marine Corps, Sue arrived in Mohave County in 1980 (after purchasing land there in 1962) and opened the General Store in Dolan Springs with David, her husband, and her parents Marie and “Bud” Hedrick. This allowed her time to pursue her passion: hiking. Sue Baughman became involved with volunteering for numerous organizations in Dolan Springs, such as the Chamber of Commerce, Community Council, Toys for Tots and Veterans of Foreign Wars. While hiking near Mt. Tipton School in 2002 she got the idea to build trails where she was hiking among the scenic Joshua trees and desert landscape. Dolan Springs was a small community with few funds for a trail system. Sue was determined to make it happen, contacting Cate Bradley of the National Park Service Rivers, Trails, and Conservation program. After six years of meeting with local government and groups, including Bureau of Land Management, Mohave County Parks Department, and the Mohave County District Supervisor, conducting surveys and filing paperwork, she received final approval for a trail project in 2008.

Sue began recruiting volunteers to help the huge task of making a trail system a reality. She worked with Volunteers of Outdoor Arizona, American Hiking Society Volunteer Vacations, Lake Ranchos Fire Department and other groups and individuals, and organized the Open Space Committee with the Dolan Springs Chamber of Commerce (now part of the Dolan Springs Community Council). She worked with Boy Scouts (three of whom earned Eagle Scout status with trail projects). Together they built trails on 480 acres of BLM land to which Mohave County has the right-of-way. Now there are almost eight miles of trails built by hand tools and open to all who want to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors, whether they are hikers, equestrians, bicyclists, geocache searchers or nature lovers. The trails are even handicap accessible. The Dolan Springs Trail System is now a 501(c) (3) nonprofit.

People from all over the country come to enjoy the trails now. In June of 2016, Sue Baughman was recognized in Washington D.C. by the Coalition for Recreational Trails for Multiple-Use Management and Corridor Sharing, winning the Tom Petri Annual Achievement Award. There is a trail named after Sue, called the Sue B. Loop. Sue gives credit to the multiple volunteers who helped make the trail system possible, but as Celeste puts it, “It began and came to be because of her vision, energy, and tenacity. It is a great Mohave County asset. Sue and the Dolan Springs Trail System story are part of our county’s history.”

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Susan Burdsal

Susan Burdsal

Education

Nominated by Phyllis Eaton

Susan Burdsal is heavily involved in making sure her students receive the best education they can. She is a teacher at the Owens School in Wikieup, teaching multiple grades for 40years. She retired in 2014, but came back to the school to teach again. She currently teaches 4th through 8th grade to 16 students. She is the only full time teacher this year. She not only teaches the regular curriculum, but is also the PE teacher, music teacher, reading specialist with an endorsement from NAU, special education teacher with an endorsement from ASU and a nurse as well as whatever else might be needed. She feels that even though it is a small school, her students can achieve many things in their lives and she pushes them to do so. The school is on a four day schedule and Burdsal has students who need extra help come in on Fridays so they can receive extra education. She was the administrator for many years at the school. Phyllis Eaton says, “I feel she is a teacher who gives her all to each and every student and who truly cares that each of her students become the best they can and a success in life.”

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Morgan Carroll

Morgan Carroll

Health & Medical Professional

Nominated by Nancy McBride

Morgan Carroll RN, BSN, CCRN has been an ICU nurse at Kingman Regional Medical Center for 37 years, giving more than half her life to those in need of intensive nursing. One woman recalled that Carroll provided outstanding care when her husband was ill, demonstrating competence, patience, compassion and calmness. She felt Carroll cared for her and her needs as assiduously as she did her husband’s. Kathy Painter RN, BSN, CCRN, noted that “Morgan is why I became an ICU nurse. Her mentoring and confidence in my ability made all the difference. The gifts she brings to her practice include professionalism, exceptional intelligence and a great loving heart. Many times people have asked her “why did you become a nurse and not a doctor?” Her response was always the same. “A nurse is what I wanted to be!”

Many speak of how she mentors others, provides leadership, her compassion and hard work. “Staff from floors come to ask her guidance, even the doctors will ask Morgan’s opinion on a difficult EKG,” according to Cathy Hamilton. Dr. Ishmael Bokhar said, “Morgan is one of the best nurses that I have met during my career as a physician.”

Dr. Robert Matheny said, “Her comments are always well thought out, based on good sound knowledge and presented in a manner that is both humble yet confident. Her presence in our ICU is invaluable to both her peers and also her patients.

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Trish Cobb

Trish Cobb

Arts

Nominated by Gail Salmon

Trish Cobb has been involved with the arts since she was a child. Her parents were musicians and she learned to play the guitar at age 13. She and her husband, Alan have a group, the Beal Street Band, which has performed for Sounds of Kingman and many other organizations and benefits since 2000. Cobb composed and performed a “theme” song for Women Making History’s awards presentation starting in 2015. She is also a key contributor for KABAM (Kingman Area Books Are Magic), an annual book festival. (Unfortunately, KABAM won’t be held this year due to personal and time issues for Cobb and others involved but they hope to continue it next year). She also offers her music at worship services at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

Trish has worked to promote music, education, and reading all her adult life. She is Library Assistant Senior in Technical Services for the Mohave County Library “and is the glue that holds things together,” according to her supervisor Bruce Carter.

A graduate of the University of Arizona with a Bachelor of Arts in Social and Behavioral Sciences, she has worked at the Philbrook Museum of Art and at Mohave Community College while raising a family, including two autistic sons. Trish Cobb is a “creative musician and a good citizen. What would we do without the Trish’s of the world?” asks her nominator Gail Salmon. Trish herself values the arts’ contribution to the human experience, stating, “The arts and artistic expression in all forms are integral to and very much part of our makeup as humans, not separate and distinct from our being.”

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Christie Freiday

Christie Freiday

Business

Nominated by Linda Miller

Christie Freiday has used her skills and perseverance to build her business here in Kingman. She used sales techniques and customer service learned through being a Mary Kay representative to fruition when she bought Stat Medical in 1985. At the time, the business had a poor reputation in the community but Freiday developed a plan and met with doctors, bringing a turnaround that has led to a successful business operation going on 31 years now. She bought out her ex-husband and is now the only woman in the state of Arizona who solely owns a corporation operating a Durable Medical Equipment (DME) facility, as well as the first DME facility in Mohave County to be accredited with Medicare.

Freiday was instrumental in forming the Healthcare Independent Business Alliance (HIBA) in 1990, for which she served as president and secretary for many years until it dissolved five years ago due to Medicare cuts. Stat Medical is one of four still remaining in Arizona but continues going strong. She is also a member of the board of Southwest Medical Equipment Association (SWMESA), part of Soroptimist International of Kingman, and was on the board of Kingman Regional Medical Center for 22 years.

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Sharon Henry

Sharon Henry

Public Services

Nominated by Sharon Dudley

Sharon Henry helped make the Low Cost Spay and Neuter Clinic a reality, “enriching the lives of both people and animals in our community.” According to nominator Sharon Dudley, the Low Cost Spay and Neuter Clinic exists due to the inspiration, persistence and lifelong work of Sharon Henry. Sharon Henry moved to Kingman in 1984 and it took her 10 years to gather resources and support to research, plan, and implement policies and practices that were in compliance with local, county and state laws and regulations. Thanks to community support and her own perseverance and love of animals and people, she was able to bring the Clinic to reality. The Low Cost Spay and Neuter Clinic address the serious issue of pet overpopulation, helping people afford both spay and neuter surgeries as well as the necessary shots for their pets as required by law. It helps raise awareness regarding the health and safety of their animals and the community at large. It has provided a valuable resource for animal rescues and helped volunteers coordinate feral cat TNR (Trap Neuter Release) programs which help humanely reduce feral cat populations over time.

Sharon Henry now runs the Gypsy Cats no-kill cat rescue on Northern Avenue. She currently houses several cats looking for a home as well as a thrift store next door. Its sole purpose is to raise money for the care and adoption of the animals. Sharon Henry has also helped many pet owners in need. Henry is about to celebrate her 75th birthday and hopes to retire once all the cats are placed in good homes. However, as Sharon Dudley notes, “retirement may not mean anything much different than maybe not having to be available seven days a week on 24- hour call!”

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Kari Jo Hill

Kari Jo Hill

Volunteerism

Nominated by Zibby Campa

Kari Jo Hill is heavily involved in her community and has “been blessed with a very caring heart,” according to her nominator Zibby Campa. She works with Grace Lutheran Church and is on many committees and volunteers as a Sunday School teacher. She volunteers at Cornerstone Mission helping “in any capacity and doing any job that needs to be done.” She belongs to Gamma Omega Sorority and is involved with many projects through it. Kari Jo is also on the board of Mission Bank and every year she buys backpacks and school supplies for students in need. Campa writes, “Families are grateful for her thoughtfulness. Throughout the years, I have watched her volunteer her time and continue to do good deeds, while showing kindness. She does this all graciously expecting nothing in return. I am proud she is here in my community because she is my champion.”

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Kelly Moore

Kelly Shuffler Moore

Professions

Nominated by Paula Shuffler

Kelly Shuffler Moore is a third generation Kingmanite, born here and has spent most of her life here aside from a few years for education and internship. In grammar school, Kelly decided she would like to be the first woman Surgeon General and sought out her school nurse, Teri Radler, to desensitize her to blood. They spent a lot of time working on this but it didn’t happen.

In high school, she often visited Dr. Tom Schrimsher, whom she had a lot of respect for how he helped people with various ailments. Upon graduation from high school, Moore attended the University of Arizona on an Air Force Scholarship in Architectural Engineering. During her first semester, she decided she wanted to purse a medical career, but she still had an aversion to working with blood. That’s what finally led her to a profession as a chiropractic physician.

Kelly graduated from the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (now the Southern California University of Health Sciences) in 1996. After one year in Los Angeles she returned to Kingman and opened Cerbat Chiropractic in 1998. She treats patients who are her friends, parents of classmates she grew up with, students and classmates of her own children, student athletes, people new to the Kingman area and many more.

She has raised four children, three with disabilities. She has been instrumental in advocating for the deaf community in Kingman. She is also been very active in her children’s sports and extracurricular activities, making sure that they are not limited by any hearing disabilities. Many of her patients have told her mother they don’t know what they’d do without her.

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Attiya Salim

Dr. Attiya Salim

Lifetime Achievement

Nominated by Pamela Englert & Mohave County Positive Change Agents

Dr. Attiya Salim feels honored by her Lifetime Achievement Award. “I can retire with peace. Kingman has recognized me, honored me, and I love Kingman. This place (her medical practice) has given me life. It is my second home.” Dr. Salim has been serving the Kingman community since 1985 as a Pain Management Specialist, Anesthesiologist, and a few years as a General Practitioner. She works at the Arizona Institute of Medicine and Surgery (AIMS) and has served many years at Kingman Regional Medical Center previously. She thanked her brother Dr. Azam Khan. “He has been my mentor. He paid for my schooling, brought me here, provided me all worldly facilities.”

She is a member of numerous civic organizations including the Arizona Society of Anesthesiology, American Society of Anesthesiology, and more. The Mohave County Positive Change Agents, a group of community members and business owners, decided together that Dr. Salim was deserving of the Lifetime Achiever Award for her positive and life-changing impact on the people she helps.

One member of the nominating group, with 31 years of business and marketing consulting said, “I think of a lifetime achiever as a person who touches lives in a way that positively impacts others, a person who begins a ripple effect which keeps spreading. In Dr. Salim’s case, she obviously created a ripple which ultimately became a wave of lifelong gratitude within our community.” Another person wrote, “Dr. Salim… doesn’t just treat people who suffer from chronic pain, or provide heartfelt, compassionate care to those who require medical treatment. Dr. Salim is a person who saves lives. Dr. Salim is a person who helps not just the person she’s treating, but also the families, friends, employees, employers, acquaintances and others who know and love the person she is treating.”

Another wrote, “Ultimately, every patient Dr. Salim helps has an opportunity to live life in the ways Dr. Salim obviously encourages – by being productive, be being involved in communities, by having the ability to participate in the joy shared by family. Dr. Salim … is a personal savior to many people in Kingman. Likewise, Dr. Salim touches the hearts and lives of countless numbers of people, and she does so genuinely, with determination and compassion. The gratitude expressed by so many people in Kingman is indisputable proof of the ultimate measure of lifetime achievement.” Dr. Salim herself is glad to help, noting that, “I think God has been a very strong force behind all the work I do.”