Originally published Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 05:56a.m.

Concerning the removal of certain Confederate memorials around the countryside, I feel some should remain and some should be removed. The monuments, both blue and gray, represent a bad time in American history. For most of us, it is unimaginable to think of human beings in slavery. Because the South believed in this type of life, the North began to squeeze them economically and this was done with the blessings of the federal government. When 13 southern states pulled out of the Union, that's when the war started.

None of us or our fathers or our grandfathers were associated with the Civil War as soldiers or slaves, so why do some continue to beat the drum? Yes, the war should be remembered. There were lessons to be learned. By keeping some monuments, they will be a reminder that inhumanity toward others should never happen again.

Displaying the Confederate flag at any government building is a different matter. Our government is the United States, not the Confederate States. Who won the war anyway? When World War II was finally won, did Americans hoist the Nazi flag up the flag pole? Of course not!

When driving though town, I will occasionally see the Confederate flag displayed in the back window of a car or truck. When asked, they will give the excuse of "Southern pride.” Through the years, the Confederate flag of 1865, which is the most popular one of the three that were designed and made, is now known for slavery and racism, nothing else. It was once the flag of the Confederate States of America, but in modern times it has evolved into a loser symbol.

T. Allen